Sir Ronald Ross


icon Back to all articles

Sir Ronald Ross the first-ever Scottish winner of the Nobel Prize for Science.

Sir Ronald Ross was the Grandfather of the present Chief of the Clan Ross and the first-ever Scottish Nobel Prize Winner. Born in India, where his father General Sir Campbell Claye Grant Ross of Shandwick was based as a soldier, Sir Ronald witnessed the devastation caused by malaria at first hand, but it was not until 1892 that he began to study it scientifically.  As a doctor in the Indian Medical Service, Sir Ronald proved in 1897 the long-suspected link between mosquitoes and malaria. In doing so he confirmed the hypotheses previously put forward independently by scientists Alphonse Laveran and Sir Patrick Manson. Ross was subsequently awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1902. Through further study, he established the complete life cycle of this parasitic organism. He was knighted in 1911 and in 1926 became Director of the Ross Institute and Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London. 

Born in India, where his father General Sir Campbell Claye Grant Ross of Shandwick was based as a soldier, Sir Ronald witnessed the devastation caused by malaria at first hand, but it was not until 1892 that he began to study it scientifically.  As a doctor in the Indian Medical Service, Sir Ronald proved in 1897 the long-suspected link between mosquitoes and malaria. In doing so he confirmed the hypotheses previously put forward independently by scientists Alphonse Laveran and Sir Patrick Manson. Ross was subsequently awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1902. Through further study, he established the complete life cycle of this parasitic organism. He was knighted in 1911 and in 1926 became Director of the Ross Institute and Hospital for Tropical Diseases in London.